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The Post Football Game

"The post football game was about to get ugly after all the others posts decided it was time to team up on little Jimmy."



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People Have More Fun Than Anyone

I once saw this wrestling poster where a certain organization was coming to this area from someplace else. The wrestlers were all from someplace else. The main event was a "Loser Leaves Town" match.

I took my niece to Wal-Mart one day. She wanted an Icee. At the Snack Bar, there was a sign on the wall that read..."Hotdogs 50 cents or 2 for $1.00."



The Birth of the 33 1/3 rpm Record

Columbia Records launched a new microgroove record, pressed in vinylite, that played at 33 1/3 rpm on June 21, 1948, marking the end of the 78 rpm shellac records and sparking a music-industry standard so strong that the digital age has yet to kill it. Developed by recording engineer Peter Goldmark, the 33 1/3 rpm record could play for twenty-three minutes per side, holding 224 to 300 grooves per inch, which compared to an average of 85 grooves per inch on 78 rpm shellac records. The following year, RCA Victor introduced the smaller 45 rpm microgroove record, also pressed in vinylite, and for a year there was a battle of the speeds, but in 1950 Victor began to produce both the 33 1/3 rpm microgroove record for longer works and the smaller 45 rpm records, which proved more ideal for popular music.

My 78's: Les Paul (The Architect)

Les Paul, born Lester William Polsfuss on June 9, 1915, was one of the pioneers of the solid-body electric guitar, which made the sound of rock and roll possible. He is credited with many recording innovations. Although not the first to use the technique, his early experiments with overdubbing, delay effects and multitrack recording were among the first to attract widespread attention. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame refers to him as an "architect." He recorded with his wife, Mary Ford, in the 1950's and they sold millions of records. One of their more popular recordings was "Vaya Con Dios (May God Be With You)," which I have in my collection of 78 r.p.m. records.

"Vaya Con Dios (May God Be With You)" was released on Capitol Records (11544) in June of 1953. Side B is "Johnny (Is The Boy For Me). The record stayed on the Billboard magazine chart for 31 weeks, peaking at #1 on August 8, 1953, where it stayed #1 for 11 weeks. The record sold more th…

Adam West was Batman!

R.I.P. Adam West, the only Batman to ever get it right.

Based on the DC comic book character of the same name, Batman also starred Burt Ward as Robin – two crime-fighting heroes who defended Gotham City from a variety of arch villains. Filled with intentional comedy and upbeat music, the TV show was aimed largely at a teenage audience. This included championing the importance of using seat belts, doing homework, eating vegetables, and drinking milk, etc. It was described by executive producer William Dozier, who was also the narrator, as "the only situation comedy on the air without a laughtrack." 120 episodes aired on ABC for three seasons, from January 12, 1966 to March 14, 1968, twice weekly for the first two and weekly for the third.


Alan Napier was Alfred, Neil Hamilton was Commissioner Gordon, Stafford Repp was Chief O'Hara and Yvonne Craig was Barbara Gordon / Batgirl.

Among the villains were Cesar Romero was the Joker, Burgess Meredith was the Penguin, Frank Go…

Choices

Life is full of choices. We may not always make the right choice and sometimes things may get a little tough.

The late Dan Miller of WSMV-TV in Nashville had a philosophy about life that rose far beyond this simple child's nursery rhyme:

Row, row, row your boat
Gently down the stream
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily
Life is but a dream


"It's a lot of work to get through life," he said. "Sometimes the choices we make don't turn out so gentle. It's a good thing when, on those rare occasions, I am able to keep both oars in the water at the same time." 

Cumberland City Was A Company Town

Cumberland City was the company town of the Poplar Mountain Coal Company. It was founded by northern businessmen who came to develop timber and coal resources in Poplar Mountain, much of which was owned by the Bruce Sloan heirs. The company acquired land, opened a mine and began cutting local timber there in the early 1860's. John H. Clark was the coal company's superintendent.

Cumberland City's population at its peak in 1870, including miners, was 225, larger than Albany at the time. The town was located near the coal mines at Short Maintain, a spur of Poplar Mountain owned by the Cyrus Guthrie heirs, with a school, tavern, saddlery, boot and shoe shop. There was even a large commisary. A company store was opened. Thomas Stephenson had a grocery and tanning yard. L.G. Campbell, was the postmaster and operated a store. He was later the pastor at Cumberland City United Methodist Church. Perry Smith and Osco Anderson also operated stores. The Albany Gazette reported in …