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Showing posts from February, 2017

Love's Swift Kick

President Theodore Roosevelt once said "no man is worth his salt who is not ready at all times to risk his body, to risk his well-being, to risk his life, in a great cause.'

This is a Valentine's Day story about the time my then six-year-old son, Elijah, went the distance for love. I can't say it was his first love, but as you will come to realize, it will no doubt forever be one of his most memorable. 

President Roosevelt's slogan was "speak softly and carry a big stick." Perhaps Elijah should have carried a big stick during his first grade year at school. I remember well the day he came home and announced that he had a girlfriend and then a few weeks later when he said, "I tried to break up her dad, but she kicked me in the shin, so I decided to stay with her."  He pulled up his pant leg and showed me the bruise.  I guess he thought it is better to be unhappy than to have a bruised shin,' as his first grade "courtship" with th…

Protecting and Preserving The Peace During The Civil War Was A Family Affair

"Tinker Dave Beaty was born 200 years ago this Feb. 19th, in 1817. During the civil war, he formed a company, known as Independent Scouts, to protect the residents of Poplar and Buffalo coves in Fentress County, then Overton County, from Confederate Guerillas and troops, who were raiding the local population. This company, which sometimes consisted of as many as one hundred men, was officially recognized by the federal government and received into the service of the Union army on January 5, 1862.

The Independent Scouts' job was to act as scouts and combat Confederate guerrillas who came through their area. They were not paid, which by definition made them guerillas, but were supplied with arms and ammunition by the Federal authorities. Each man was required to furnish his own horse and equipment.

For me, David Beaty's Independent Scouts was a family affair. Tinker Dave's father, George, was my 4th great-grandfather. His sister, Matilda, married John Boles, a for…