Wednesday, May 27, 2015

The American Revolution: Eight Generations Ago

"During the American Revolutionary War, almost every able-bodied man, who was not a part of the Continental Army, joined their local Milita to help protect the settlement in which they lived. Such was the case for Jacob Speck. On July 21, 1780, General Horatio Gates was at Camden, South Carolina commanding a force of 3,200 troops of which Jacob was a part of. The British general, Lord Charles Cornwalis, was also there with an army of 2,100. Even though Gates had Cornwalis outnumbered, most of the americans lacked experience and training. The North Carlina Militia had never been tried. Gates was advised NOT to go into battle under the circumstances. But, he ignored the warning.

Just before dawn on August 16th, the British troops opened the battle as the right flank fired volley's into the militia regiments, causing a significant number of casualties. When the remaining militia looked up, they saw British troops advancing toward them with their bayonets drawn. The militia did not have bayonets to counter the attack. As panic began to spread, most of the militia fled before the British regiments reached them. General Gates was among the first to run. Within a matter of minutes, the whole rebel left wing had evaporated. When the smoke and dust from the cannon volley's cleared, laying among the dead on the battlefield was Jacob Speck. My ancestor, George Speck, never knew his father, but I am reminded that God never closes one door without opening another. Before his death, He had allowed Jacob to plant the seeds that would produce many future generations of Speck family members, including me."
- Randy Speck

Son of:
Glenn Darrell Speck
Birth: 4 Jun. 1938, Overton Co., TN
Death:  29 Jun. 2003, Clinton Co., KY
Burial: Memorial Hill, Clinton Co., KY
Married to: Glenda Boles, 1 Sept. 1956 at Clinton County, KY.
Birth: Feb. 4 1939, Clinton Co., KY
Daughter of Elmer Boles (1918 - 2002) and Vada Frost (1916-2003)


Son of:
Cecil Speck
Birth: 22 Apr. 1917, Overton Co., TN
Death: 8 Feb. 1986, Jefferson Co., KY
Burial: Memorial Hill, Clinton County, KY
Married to: Dimple Means, 22 May 1937
Birth: 8 Mar. 1918, Overton Co., TN
Death:  22 Feb. 1986, Clinton Co., KY
Burial: Memorial Hill, Clinton Co., KY
Daughter of William Ezra Means (1879-1958) and Della Craig (1882-1958)


Son of:
Obed Speck
Birth: 11 Jan. 1888, Overton Co., TN
Death:  30 Oct. 1950, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Ledbetter Cemetery, Overton Co., TN Married to: Josie L. Ledbetter, 1910
Birth: 21 Mar. 1892, Overton Co., TN
Death: 27 Apr. 1936, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Ledbetter Cemetery, Overton Co., TN
Daughter of Al Ledbetter (b.1869) and Del Eads (1874-1927)


Son of:
James Wiley Speck
Birth: 2 Dec. 1859, Overton Co., TN
Death:  9 Jul. 1941, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Liberty Cemetery, Overton Co., TN
Married to: Margaret McDonald, 8 Aug 1882 in Overton Co., TN
Birth: 16 Dec. 1861, Overton Co., TN
Death:  10 Mar. 1905, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Liberty Cemetery, Overton Co., TN
Daughter of Henry McDonald (1828-1904) and Rebecca Dishman (1834-1912)


Son of:
William Calvin Speck
Birth: 3 Jan. 1840, Overton Co., TN
Death: 6 Jun. 1903, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Liberty Cemetery, Overton Co., TN
Private Co I 25 Tenn Infantry CSA
Married to: Martha S. Walker about 1860
Birth: 8 Apr. 1839, Overton Co., TN
Death:  5 Oct. 1920, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Liberty Cemetery, Overton Co., TN
Daughter of James Walker (1803-1858) and Elizabeth Snodgrass (1803-1879)


Son of :
John Speck
Birth: 3 Oct. 1812, North Carolina
Death:  7 Sep. 1886, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Highland Cemetery, Overton Co., TN
Married to: Nancy Ashburn
Birth: 3 May 1818
Death: 22 Dec. 1896, Overton Co., TN
Burial: Highland Cemetery, Overton Co., TN
Daughter of Jesse Ashburn (1787-1860) and Martha Patsy Lanier (1785-1864)


Son of:
George Speck
Birth: 1781, Stokes Co., North Carolina
Death: 22 May 1846, Overton Co., TN
Married to: Barbara Foreman
Birth: 1779, Stokes Co., North Carolina
Death: 1850-1860, Overton Co., TN
Daughter of John Foreman (wife unknown)


Son of:
Jacob Speck, Sr.
Birth: 29 Apr. 1753, Lancaster Co., PA
Death: 16 Aug. 1780, South Carolina
Battle of Camden, South Carolina
Burial: Believed to be in a mass grave on the site of the battlefield
Married to: Catherine Keefer
Birth: About 1758, York Co., PA
After 4 Jan. 1783, Rowan Co., NC
Daughter of Abraham Kieffer (1728-1765) and Christina Sprinkle (1737-1778)



 

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

An Evening of Music: Betsy Lane Shepherd, American Concert Soprano Music Program

Many thanks to Jane Metters LaBarbara for including parts of my story on early recording artist Betsy Lane Shepherd in an article she wrote about Shepherd entitled...

"An Evening of Music: Betsy Lane Shepherd, American Concert Soprano Music Program."

Her article can be found online at the West Virginia University 'WVU Libraries' site.

(click here)

It was posted September 8, 2014 by Stewart Plein, Rare Book Librarian at WVU.








Monday, May 25, 2015

Now I Lay Me Down To Sleep


Found in the knapsack of a soldier of the Civil War, after he had been slain in battle.

Near the camp fire's flickering light
In my blanket bed I lie
Gazing through the shades of night
And the twinkling stars on high
O'er me spirits in the air 
Silent vigils seem to keep
As I breathe my childhood's prayer
"Now I lay me down to sleep"

Sadly sings the whip-poor-will
In the boughs of yonder tree
Laughingly the dancing rill 
Swells the midnight melody
Foemen may be lurking near
In the canyon dark and deep
Low I breathe in Jesus' ear
"I pray Thee, Lord, my soul to keep" 

'Mid those stars one face I see
One the Saviour turned away
Mother, who, in Infancy
Taught my baby lips to pray
Her sweet spirit hovers near
In this lonely mountain-brake
Take me to her, Saviour, dear
"If I should die before I wake" 

Fainter grows the flickering light
As each ember slowly dies
Plaintively the birds of night
Fill the air with saddening cries
Over me they seem to cry
"You may never more awake" 
Low I lisp, If I should die
I pray Thee, Lord, my soul to take"

No Greater Love



"Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends." (John 15:13)

"Oh, tell me not that they are dead, that generous host, that airy army of invisible heroes. They hover as a cloud of witnesses above this nation. Are they dead that yet speak louder than we can speak, and a more universal language? Are they dead that yet act? Are they dead that yet move upon society, and inspire the people with nobler motives, and more heroic patriotism?

Ye that mourn, let gladness mingle with your tears. It was your son, but now he is the nation's. He made your household bright: now his example inspires a thousand households. Dear to his brothers and sisters, he is now brother to every generous youth in the land. Before, he was narrowed, appropriated, shut up to you. Now he is augmented, set free, and given to all. Before, he was yours: he is ours. He has died from the family, that he might live to the nation. Not one name shall be forgotten: or neglected : and it shall by and by be confessed of our modern heroes, it is of an ancient hero, that he did more for his country by his death than by his whole life."

(Henry Ward Beecher)

Saturday, May 23, 2015

The Battle of Camden: A Memorial Day Tribute To My Ancestor, Jacob Speck


During the American Revolutionary War, almost every able-bodied man, who was not a part of the Continental Army, joined their local Militia to help protect the settlement in which they lived. Such was the case for Jacob Speck. On July 21, 1780, General Horatio Gates was at Camden, South Carolina commanding a force of 3,200 troops of which Jacob was a part of. The British general, Lord Charles Cornwallis, was also there with an army of 2,100. Even though Gates had Cornwallis outnumbered, most of the Americans lacked experience and training. The North Carlina Militia had never been tried. Gates was advised NOT to go into battle under the circumstances. But, he ignored the warning.

Just before dawn on August 16th, the British troops opened the battle as the right flank fired volley's into the militia regiments, causing a significant number of casualties. When the remaining militia looked up, they saw British troops advancing toward them with their bayonets drawn. The militia realized they did not have bayonets to counter the attack. Panic began to spread and most of the militia fled before the British regiments reached them. General Gates was among the first to run from the field, leaving his remaining troops on the field alone. Within a matter of minutes, the whole rebel left wing had evaporated.

Five years earlier, Jacob and Catherine Speck had gotten married. She was 16 at the time. Jacob Jr. was now four, Michael had just turned two and a third son, George, my 6th great-grandfather, was less than two months old. It is hard to imagine what Catherine must have thought or felt as she watched her husband leave home to defend their new settlement. It is even harder to imagine what she must have felt later. For you see...in that pre-dawn hour on that warm August 16, 1780 morning, when the smoke and dust from the cannon volley's had finally cleared, Jacob Speck lay dead on the battlefield.

God never closes one door without opening another. Before his death, He allowed Jacob to plant the seeds that would produce many future generations of Speck family members, including me.


The Battle of Point Pleasant: A Memorial Day Tribute To My Ancestor, John Frogge, Jr.

In 1774, the Ohio Valley indians were trying to drive back the white invaders from their hunting grounds and the Virginians were seeking only to protect their settlements from the rifle, tomahawk and scalping knife. The call for volunteers went out. John Frogge, Jr. had a young pregnant wife and a three-year-old child at home and hesitated to enlist, but wanting to join his cousins, neighbors and fellow countrymen for their retribution against the Indians, he told his wife that he would only provide an escort for the militia and would return prior to the engagement. He told her that he would only act as a sutler behind enemy lines, providing them with provisions such as blankets and food. So, after organizing, the men marched to Point Pleasant, Ohio. What they did not realize was that the Indians were watching them. After dark on the evening of October 9, the Shawnee, led by chief Cornstalk, crossed the Ohio River and were ready to surprise the Virginians at daybreak...except for one unseen event.

In the early morning hours of October 10, 1774, two soldiers had left camp to hunt deer when they found themselves surrounded by the indians. One of the soldiers was killed. The other managed to escape and ran back to warn the others. The 300-man army suddenly found themselves standing face to face with the entire united force of the enemy, Ohio indians. The battle lasted all day. Just before sunset, the Shawnees mistook a group of reinforcements as fresh troops and fled across the Ohio River and back to their villages. Even though they were greatly outnumbered, the Virginians had managed to win the fight, but the battle had claimed the lives of many men, including John Frogge, Jr., who did not have time to return to his family as he had promised he would.

On the morning of the battle, John Frogge, Jr.'s three-year-old daughter, Elizabeth, was sleeping at the family's home in Staunton, Virginia, when suddenly she awoke screaming that the Indians were killing her father. She was quieted by her mother and again went to sleep, only to wake up screaming not once but twice more repeating what she had said earlier, that the Indians were killing her father. After the third time, the girls mother believed it was a sign that her husband had been scalped by the Indians. Her cries drew together her neighbors and soon all of Staunton was in a state of commotion. Soon...all of Staunton would know that the little girls dream was real.

John Frogge, Jr. was my 5th great uncle on my mom's side.


Hanging On The Old Barbed Wire

If you want to find the old battalion
I know where they are
I know where they are
I know where they are

If you want to find the old battalion
I know where they are
They're hanging on the old barbed wire

I've seen 'em
I've seen 'em
Hanging on the old barbed wire

I've seen 'em
I've seen 'em
Hanging on the old barbed wire



Wednesday, May 20, 2015

The Cold Hard Facts Of Life

I recently discovered this piece of audio on side two of a reel-to-reel tape. It was recorded sometime during February of 1967.

The participants in the recording are Elmer Goodman, a well-known longtime disc jockey at WANY radio station in Albany, Kentucky, and a well-known musician, who performed at the Renfro Valley Barn Dance. The other participant in the recording is Ray Mullinix, the longtime owner and disc jockey at WKYR radio station in Burkesville, Kentucky, and who began his career with Elmer at WANY. Ray would also become a Kentucky State Representative.


Elmer: "And now here's R.G. Mullinix (aka Ray) and he's got his old steam-heated electric guitar around his neck and he's gonna pick one for ya. I don't know what it's gonna be, but I'm gonna let him tell ya what it is. R.G., what about it?"

(18-year-old Ray has been strumming an acoustic guitar as Elmer was speaking. He stops long enough to introduce the song...)

Ray: "It's Porter Wagoner's new one, The Cold Hard Facts Of Life."

Elmer: "Alright!"

(After Ray is finished singing, the dialogue continues with Elmer.)

"Oh that's a good job there, R.G., on that one. That's one of Porter's latest releases for RCA Victor and I happen to have that new album by Porter. It's called The Cold Hard Facts Of Life. It's got a picture of Porter coming through the door and there's his wife with another guy. He's got this satchel in his hand and a knife, it (the lyrics) says put away that knife, and you ought to see the looks on their faces, as the words of the song says. You done a fine job on that one, R.G., and I want to listen to that one back and see how it's gonna sound, okay."

The album cover photo, which Elmer eluded to, was shocking for its time, and would be anytime, but in spite of it, the LP was a big success. 'The Cold Hard Facts Of Life' was written by Bill Anderson.The song went as high as #2 on Billboard's country chart and stayed on the chart for several weeks.

By the way, I agree with Elmer that Ray did a 'good job on that one.'

Elmer Goodman died in 1994. Ray Mullinix died in 2002.




God Knows

"Now I lay" - "Repeat it, darling."
"Lay me," lisped the tiny lips
of my daughter kneeling,
bending o'er her folded fingertips.

"Down to sleep." - "To sleep" she murmured
and the curly head bent low.
- "I pray the Lord," I gently added,
"You can say it all, I know"

"Pray the Lord"- the sound came faintly, then fainter still - "My soul to keep."
Then the tired head fairly nodded
and the child was fast asleep.

But the dewy eyes, half opened
when I clasped her to my breast,
and the dear voice softly whispered
- "Mama, God knows all the rest"

Oh the trusting, sweet confiding
of the child heart.
Would that I thus might
trust my Heavenly Father,
He who hears my feeblest cry.


Monday, May 18, 2015

Lindle Castle: A Shining Star


"(Lindle) Castle is a ball-hawking specialist that set up the Cat's fast break offense." - Bob Gorham, The Kentucky Kernel (March 3, 1950)

Happy Birthday to Coach Lindle Castle. He turns 85 this Wednesday, May 20th. It's hard to believe that, but then again it's hard to believe I'm 55. As a freshman at the University of Kentucky, the Winchester, Kentucky native, Castle, was a shining star. He was a starter on the 1949-50 Kittens team that won 15 games and lost just once, with Lindle averaging 8.2 points per game.


In an article published in The Kentucky Kernel on March 3, 1950 and written by Bob Gorham (page 5), UK Kittens coach Harry Lancaster said the 1949-50 team was "the best freshman basketball club we've ever had." He said that right after his team had just finished one of the most successful seasons ever enjoyed by a freshman quintet at Kentucky. In 16 games, the Kittens averaged 79.3 points per game, while holding their opponents to 47.5 points per game. They made 498 field goals in 1,398 attempts for 31.3% and hit 273 of 427 free throws for 63.9%.


"This year's group of Kittens had standout performers in every department of play." - Bob Gorsham.

Indeed, they did. In scoring, they were led by two future NBA hall-of-famers, Cliff Hagan and Frank Ramsey. "Both these boys," wrote Gorham, "possess a wide variety of shots and can hit with deadly accuracy. Hagan connected on 114 of 243 shots attempted from the field for a remarkable average of 47% in amassing 268 points to take the scoring crown. Ramsey was not far behind, having rung the bell 109 times in 274 assaults on the cords for 43% and 264 points. Hagan had a 22.3 per game average for 12 contests, while Ramsey contributed an average of 16.5 points in 16 tilts."

Gorham continued to write, 'As for rebounding, 6'5 Lou Tsioropoulos took a back seat to no one when it came to snatching the ball off the boards, to combine with Hagan and Ramsey in this department to give Kentucky control of the leather for most of the games." He said, "The Kittens fired goalward 1,398 times this season while their opponents were allowed only 1,044 tries. This means they usually got about 22 more shots per game than the opposition, and this was due in no small way to lanky Lou."

"On defense, the two shining lights were Dick Pikrone and Lindle Castle, a pair of fast guards. Pikrone consistently did a good job of dogging the other team's hottest scorer, while Castle is a ball-hawking specialist that set up the Cat's fast break offense."


During his sophomore season at UK, Lindle Castle only appeared in five games for coach Adolph Rupp's team that won the national championship. Only five players from the freshman team (Hagan, Ramsey, Tsioropopoulos, Castle and Dwight Price) were on the roster of the 1950-51 team that was already loaded with talented players, including Bill Spivey, Shelby Linville, Bobby Watson, Walter Hirsch and Lucian Whitaker.

Left to right: Lindle Castle, Walter Hirsch and Bill Spivey.

Lindle Castle was equally as talented as the others, but sadly, he did not get the playing time he deserved. Following his sophomore season, Lindle transferred to Morehead State University, where he saw plenty of action playing for legendary coach Ellis Johnson. Like Lindle Castle at Clinton County, the arena at Morehead State bears the name of Ellis Johnson, the all-time winningest coach there.

Just as Lindle Castle began his college career as a shining star at the University of Kentucky, he ended his college career as a shining star at Morehead State University by being named to the All-OVC team (1952-53).

In the photo above is Clark County Coach Letcher Norton and one of his teams during Lindle Castle's time there. Castle is second from the right.

In high school, Lindle Castle played on three Sweet Sixteen teams - 1947, 1948 and 1949 - for coach Norton Letcher's Clark County. In 1949, his senior year, he was named to the All-State team. Clark County would appear in six straight state tournaments, from 1947 to 1952. The 1951 Linville Puckett-led team won the state championship.


As a coach at Clinton County, Lindle Castle took his1960 team to the state tournament. In 19 seasons at CCHS (1957-71, 1975-80), Coach Castle's teams won 273 games and lost 216. His teams won one regional championship (1960), five district championships (1959, 1960, 1961, 1963 and 1967), and runner up in 1962 and 1966. The 1961-62 team gave him a career-best record of 30 wins and only 4 losses.

~~~

Ironically, of the coaches mentioned above, Adolph Rupp, Ellis Johnson, Norton Letcher and Lindle Castle all have gymnasiums named after them.

I am fortunate to be counted among the many who grew up on or around the basketball court and knew Lindle Castle as coach and/or teacher. As far as his teams go, the bond between coach and player will always be strong. After all...




Thursday, May 14, 2015

Roots That Run Deep


I love writing about local history. It's even sweeter when I m able to write about my church or my ancestors. In this short piece I am writing today, it is about both.

My church, Clear Fork Baptist Church, was established on April 1, 1802. I have stated before that my 5th great uncle, Jacob Speck, Jr., a brother to my direct ancestor on my dad's side, and his family joined the church on July 23, 1803. But, did you also know that my 6th great-grandmother on my mom's side, Mary Mitchell Frogge (pronounced Frow-ge), joined the church by letter on Sept. 27, 1806?

Both sides of my family tree were present in my church when it was just four years old! I love how my ancestral roots run deep in the church I grew up in and still attend today.

Now, about Mary Mitchell Frogge...

Back in Virginia, in 1750, her Aunt Agatha married John Madison, the great uncle of our 4th President, James Madison. And, that's not all. Her Aunt Sarah was the mother of our 12th President, Zachary Taylor. After migrating here about 1800, Mary Mitchell Frogge and her family lived on Indian Creek. One of her son's, Arthur Robinson Frogge, lived at Ill Will and later, at Pall Mall.

Mary Mitchell was born 1753 in Augusta County, Virginia and died in 1831 in Cumberland County, Kentucky (later Clinton County). She married William Frogge in 1770 in Culpeper County, Virginia. He was the son of Sheriff John Frogge and Elizabeth Strother Frogge.

Mary and William were the great-great-great-grandparents of my great-grandmother, Nannie Koger Boles, the wife of Hige Boles.


(From the church records of September 1806)




Wednesday, May 13, 2015

The Wall


"It's sad how some people spend all of their time building a wall when what they should be building is a bridge."

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

I Want A New Rug

I want a new rug
One that won't let me slip
One that won't let me fall on the floor
And maybe break my hip

I want a new rug
One you can shampoo
When you shake it out each night
And the bugs fly all over you

Chorus
One that won't make me embarrassed
Wondering what to do
Whenever I get sick
Will I throw up on it or you
All over you


I want a new rug
One you can throw away
When you can't get the stains all out
Not even with spray

I want a new rug
One I can vacuum
And when I want to sleep in the floor
It will cover me and you

(Chorus)

I want a new rug
One that does what it should
One that won't make my face break out
Or my hands, that wouldn't be good

I want a new rug
Maybe green or gold
One that will still be around
Whenever I am really old

(Chorus)


Blessed Are The Peacemakers


"Blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God."

It was during the late winter and early spring of 1862, as the civil war was now in full swing, that the Union and Confederate factions of the Upper Cumberland attempted to reach a peaceful compromise in order to prevent the raids that were occuring in Fentress and Overton counties in Tennessee, and Clinton County in Kentucky. Murder, theft and arson had become commonplace during the absence of regular soldiers who had gone off to fight in the war. A peace conference was held at Monroe in Overton County. The Northern side was represented by men from Fentress and Clinton counties. The southern side was represented by men from Overton County. Since confederate guerilla Champ Ferguson was committing the largest number of atrocities, he was invited to the conference to represent the Confederate interests of Clinton County. That was a big mistake.

Although the parties agreed not to raid into adjoining counties, the Monroe Compromise was dead from the start. Within hours Ferguson and his men killed four Overton County men on his way back to Clinton County. Ferguson, among others, would carry on a murderous rampage throughout the war against all who were in support of the Union.

"Blessed are they which are persecuted for righteousness' sake: for theirs is the kingdom of heaven."

Before the war's end, most of the Union men who had participated in the Monroe Compromise were killed, most within the first year: James Zachary, Thomas Wood, William Johnson, Robert Martin, Joseph Stover, Louis Pierce, Eli Hatfield, Parson Joseph Dalton, a Mr. Taylor and John McDonald. Another who was murdered was my third great-grandfather.

"Blessed are ye, when men shall revile you, and persecute you, and shall say all manner of evil against you falsely, for my sake."

On the morning of Sunday, June 1, 1862, 32-year-old Elisha or "Elijah" Koger arose from his bed and headed out to the spring with his wife, Nancy, beside him. Shots rang out as a band of men appeared suddenly out of nowhere. Nancy screamed fo Elijah to run. As he tried to flee, Ferguson overtook him and shot him. Koger threw up his arms and said something, but Nancy could not make out his words because the couple's children were screaming. Shots continued to ring out as Elijah ran toward a fence some fifty yards from the home in the Oak Grove community. With Ferguson and nine other men following him, Elijah reached the fence and when he tried to cross it, Ferguson rode up close to him and shot him one more time. By the time Nancy reached the fence, the couple's 11-year-old daughter, Sarah, was holding her daddy in her arms. She was covered in blood. When Nancy reached Elisha, he gasped once, but never spoke. He had been shot more than 30 times. Nancy knelt beside her slain husband's body as Ferguson and his outlaw gang ransacked the Koger home.

"Rejoice, and be exceeding glad: for great is your reward in heaven."

Even though he was violently killed for his efforts, I am very proud that my ancestor, a leader in his community, had it in his heart to arrange a peace agreement that would have stopped the senseless acts of violence that overshadowed the civil war conflict in Clinton, Fentress and Overton counties. Even though he and the others were part of their communities' home guard, they should have received a medal of honor, or some other great recognition for the peacemakers that they were. I want to also mention that there were other Union men who were at the Monroe Compromise meeting who were pursued and terrorized throughout the war, but not killed.

As for Champ Ferguson, on October 20, 1865, he was hanged for the brutal murder of Elijah Koger and 52 others he had been convicted of murdering during the war.

~~~

The historical significance of the Monroe Compromise rests upon the premise of what might have been. It is a story of reasonable men searching for solace in unreasonable times. It is the story of lives lost and families destroyed. I am at least honored to count my ancestor as being part of that brave group of men.

For the record, I had family members on both sides of the Civil War conflict, who were both persecuted and harmed over what they believed in.


Elijah Koger was the grandfather of my great-grandmother, Nannie Koger Boles.


Tuesday, May 5, 2015

A Prayer For America


President Ronald Reagan said the image of George Washington kneeling in the snow praying at Valley Forge "personified a people who knew it was not enough to depend on their own courage and goodness; they must also seek help from God, their Father and their Preserver."

Folks, if ever there was a time America needed the intervention of God, it is now. But, in order to change our nation, we, as individuals, must be willing to change.

"If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land." 2 Chronicles 7:14

Oh that we might have a fresh spiritual awakening in America!


My Trials Are God's Mercies

We each have periods in our lives where we wonder, "Where are you God?" But, it is during these times that, if we seek Him, we ...