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Showing posts from January, 2017

"God is Able" by MLK, Jr.

"Life is hard, at times as hard as crucible steel. It has its bleak and difficult moments. Like the ever-flowing waters of the river, life has its moments of drought and its moments of flood. Like the ever-changing cycle of the seasons, life has the soothing warmth of its summers and the piercing chill of its winters. And if one will hold on, he will discover that God walks with him and that GOD IS ABLE to lift you from the fatigue of despair to the buoyancy of hope, and transform dark and desolate valleys into sunlit paths of inner peace."

(From "Eulogy of the Martyred Children, September 18, 1963)

The Cornfield Princess: Bullet in the Dark

Selah Elizabeth "Bessie" Jones was the daughter of Nesbit Hert and Jane (Upchurch) Jones. Sometime after her death, the family moved to Crowell, Texas. Bessie is buried at Cartwright Cemetery.


Her tombstone reads:

Selah E. Jones
Born May 3, 1886
Assassinated Sep 17, 1900

Her busy hands are folded
Her work on earth is done
Her trials are all ended
Her heavenly crown is won


Battle Hymn of the Republic Recording is 100 Years Old

Mine eyes have seen the glory
of the coming of the Lord
He is trampling out the vintage
where the grapes of wrath are stored
He has loosed the fateful lightening
of His terrible swift sword
His truth is marching on


Thomas Chalmers' recording of "Battle Hymn Of The Republic" is 100-years-old this year. He recorded his version on May 29, 1917 (Edison Records, 82133-R).

According to the Library of Congress, "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" went through a number of versions in the years immediately before the Civil War. Its tune and its early lyrics were written by William Steffe about 1856. Its first verse and refrain were:


Say brothers, will you meet us?
Say brothers, will you meet us?
Say brothers, will you meet us?
On Canaan's happy shore?

Glory, glory hallelujah!
Glory, glory hallelujah!
Glory, glory hallelujah!
For ever, evermore!

The song first gained popularity around Charleston, South Carolina, where it was sung as a Methodist Camp Meeting song, pa…