Wednesday, August 3, 2016

Eulogy for a Bluegrass Legend

WSM and Grand Ole Opry announcer Eddie Stubbs officiated the funeral service of bluegrass legend Don Parmley at Hicks-Vaughn Funeral Home in Monticello Tuesday night.

Parmley, who was born in Wayne County in 1933, died July 31st at the age of 83. His group, Bluegrass Cardinals, was an early influence in the world of bluegrass music. Stubbs said the standard of excellence set by that group was second to none.

"The Bluegrass Cardinals rose very quickly to become a very, very important product of their time, the late 1970's and all through the 80's. Their standard of excellence on record and in person was second to none. There was a lot of complexity within the Bluegrass Cardinals music, made in 3-chord songs they were doing, but it was that complexity within that simplicity that made that music so great with all those intricacies."

Stubbs said Bluegrass Cardinals deserve to be in the IBMA Hall of Fame. At a time when that organization was still in its infancy, Bluegrass Cardinals were already going strong, making great records and enjoying a huge and loyal following.

"It's only a matter of time, I feel like, before the International Bluegrass Music Association recognizes the Bluegrass Cardinals with an induction into its hall of fame. What Don and David Parmley did and their vision and the music that they made was extraordinary. It's timeless music, and as Bill Monroe said, "A record is forever. Those things will outlive us all."

For 9 of the 11 years it was on the air, Don Parmley played all of the banjo parts on the Beverly Hillbillies TV show, with the exception of the theme song. Because of his behind the scenes work, Stubbs said it is untelling how many banjos were sold or how many people were inspired to play banjo by a face they never got to see.

Stubbs said Don Parmley's life was one that was filled with friendship, compassion, love for his family and friends, hard work, a lot of good times, lots of humor, busses and lots and lots of great music.



No comments:

Post a Comment

The Invention of the LP

The long-playing microgroove 33-1/3 rpm phonograph disc, the standard for incorporating multiple or lengthy recorded works on a single dis...